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  • Correcting Ink Mistakes

    What do you guys use when correcting ink mistakes?

    I use traditional pencil, paper and an ink pen and I was curious about what you guys use to fix any mistakes that you may make when inking? I see that some people use white out, others use white ink and some use white gel pens. I've used all three, but I'm not to happy with the results, I think white out might be the best solution, but I'd like to hear your opinions.

    What is your preference and why?

  • #2
    If you're drawing on illustration board like Bristol, you can fix small mistakes by carefully picking out the ink with a razor blade.
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    • #3
      I've used white-out but it's not easy to ink on I've found. Long time ago, I've tried small bits of paper glued over the mistake - it worked ok, you keep a little edge but the colour of the paper blends beter. To hide the edge (like when making a photocopy...as I said, a long time ago) paint the edges of the glue-ons with whiteout. Works also when putting the lettering in balloons.

      Now I don't really care how the original looks - it all ends up on-line or in print anyway, the original is just the thing I scan and colour. So I don't bother fixing the mistakes on the original, I just print out another copy of the areas I need to fix as blueprints and ink them again. Then it's quite easy to replace those areas with the computer. I know I'll make a mistake here and there, and working like this makes it all a bit more relaxed - when the original is done, I just collect all the messed-up parts on another piece of paper (often the back of a used piece of Bristol) and do them again.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by pell View Post
        If you're drawing on illustration board like Bristol, you can fix small mistakes by carefully picking out the ink with a razor blade.
        Crazy...I wouldn't have guessed that. Thanks for that tip, I'll be sure to try it out next time.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by shaw View Post
          I've used white-out but it's not easy to ink on I've found. Long time ago, I've tried small bits of paper glued over the mistake - it worked ok, you keep a little edge but the colour of the paper blends beter. To hide the edge (like when making a photocopy...as I said, a long time ago) paint the edges of the glue-ons with whiteout. Works also when putting the lettering in balloons.

          Now I don't really care how the original looks - it all ends up on-line or in print anyway, the original is just the thing I scan and colour. So I don't bother fixing the mistakes on the original, I just print out another copy of the areas I need to fix as blueprints and ink them again. Then it's quite easy to replace those areas with the computer. I know I'll make a mistake here and there, and working like this makes it all a bit more relaxed - when the original is done, I just collect all the messed-up parts on another piece of paper (often the back of a used piece of Bristol) and do them again.
          What an interesting solution, sounds like a tedious process, but if the results are good then why not, right? Doing it this way, does that mean you'd have several pieces of paper for any single piece of art? Or do you print out the corrected version once you're done?

          I've also noticed that inking over white-out isn't the same as inking over paper, plus, in my case, white-out leaves a shine on the paper that for me is frustrating to look at, personal quirk I guess. I was curious to see if there was another way to correct these ink mistakes and yeah, thanks for your feedback!

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          • #6
            I don't like the shine of white-out either, but it's just something you have to use once in a while. It kind of attracts my eye like a magnet, it somewhat spoils the illusion of a drawing.

            I have usually at least 3 pieces of paper for any comic/drawing I make. I have the scene in my head (mostly - sometimes I use a thumbnail, but my stuff is pretty simple) then I draw the characters needed, the size I find easiest to draw. So I have an A4 with (say) 5 people on it. Then I scan it and place the actors on a template for the strip - keeping in mind the perspective needed for each panel and the text areas, and re-sizing the figures where needed.

            I print that out and do the backgrounds. I find it very nice to be able to play around with backgrounds and try stuff out without having to be careful when erasing. If I didn't get it quite right on the first lay-out, I'll re-size/move the people around a bit - but after a while you tend to see it the first time and again - my stuff is pretty much only 1 or 2 point perspective, fairly easy. And if the panel is too big for believable perspective -I shrink it and do that panel alone on another sheet. It's made my life a lot easier - have a 80 cm ruler but my working space isn't big enough to do everything full size.

            Then I scan that all and print it out in blue on Bristol and ink it with a brush. Often I'll already copy parts and put them in the margins if they fit - things I might want to try in a couple of ways, or stuff I might mess up and then I have a couple of chances with no extra work. And no erasing, I love it.

            It might be more work and not handy for more complex pieces, but it's made the process a lot more relaxed and fun for me.

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            • #7
              I recently ordered some white ink ballpoint pens on Amazon (from Japan) and They are great for fixing inking mistakes and adding in highlights. Previously I used a very fine detail brush and white ink, but the pens are far less a mess and more mobile

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Maulsmash View Post
                I recently ordered some white ink ballpoint pens on Amazon (from Japan) and They are great for fixing inking mistakes and adding in highlights. Previously I used a very fine detail brush and white ink, but the pens are far less a mess and more mobile
                That white ink ballpoint pens you recently bought, wouldn't happen to be a Gelly Roll 08 Sakura pen, would it?

                And yes, the ink brushes and the white ink can get real messy real fast and it can sometimes be a burdern more than a help for the artwork. I would normally turn to white out, but the finish it leaves bothers me a bit, so I wonder if there's any other solutions out there.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by shaw View Post
                  I don't like the shine of white-out either, but it's just something you have to use once in a while. It kind of attracts my eye like a magnet, it somewhat spoils the illusion of a drawing.

                  I have usually at least 3 pieces of paper for any comic/drawing I make. I have the scene in my head (mostly - sometimes I use a thumbnail, but my stuff is pretty simple) then I draw the characters needed, the size I find easiest to draw. So I have an A4 with (say) 5 people on it. Then I scan it and place the actors on a template for the strip - keeping in mind the perspective needed for each panel and the text areas, and re-sizing the figures where needed.

                  I print that out and do the backgrounds. I find it very nice to be able to play around with backgrounds and try stuff out without having to be careful when erasing. If I didn't get it quite right on the first lay-out, I'll re-size/move the people around a bit - but after a while you tend to see it the first time and again - my stuff is pretty much only 1 or 2 point perspective, fairly easy. And if the panel is too big for believable perspective -I shrink it and do that panel alone on another sheet. It's made my life a lot easier - have a 80 cm ruler but my working space isn't big enough to do everything full size.

                  Then I scan that all and print it out in blue on Bristol and ink it with a brush. Often I'll already copy parts and put them in the margins if they fit - things I might want to try in a couple of ways, or stuff I might mess up and then I have a couple of chances with no extra work. And no erasing, I love it.

                  It might be more work and not handy for more complex pieces, but it's made the process a lot more relaxed and fun for me.
                  Nice! I recently did an art piece in which I sort of used the technique that you mention here. I did the character first, inking him out as need and when I felt I was done, I scanned it, printed it and began working on the backgrounds and yeah, I see that if there are any mistakes made while working on the background then solving the problem would be as easy as printing out another sheet and starting again. I like that approach and I feel that I may use it more often and yeah, thanks for the idea.

                  I noticed that I can also use this to add a great variety to the drawing. For example, I can set my character in an urban setting, in the jungle, the desert or anywhere else I'd like without having to do the whole drawing all over again, which is great!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Elliot Rodriguez View Post

                    That white ink ballpoint pens you recently bought, wouldn't happen to be a Gelly Roll 08 Sakura pen, would it?

                    And yes, the ink brushes and the white ink can get real messy real fast and it can sometimes be a burdern more than a help for the artwork. I would normally turn to white out, but the finish it leaves bothers me a bit, so I wonder if there's any other solutions out there.
                    No. It is a Uni-ball Signo UM-153, the rest of the lettering on the pen is in Japanese
                    Last edited by Maulsmash; 01-14-2020, 09:23 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Oh ok, cool. Thanks for that info, I may just put in an order myself for one of those, I'd like to see how it works. I have that Gelly Roll Sakura pen and it's nice, but what I don't like is that the white isn't that white and when it hits the black areas it mixes together a bit and gives me this greyish tone to the white lines, which isn't what I want. Maybe that Uni-bal Signo could be a solution, thanks!!

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                      • #12
                        This is different from a gel pen, at least it feels different and the white are very white and I haven’t run into it mixing with black ink yet

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Elliot Rodriguez View Post

                          Nice! I recently did an art piece in which I sort of used the technique that you mention here. I did the character first, inking him out as need and when I felt I was done, I scanned it, printed it and began working on the backgrounds and yeah, I see that if there are any mistakes made while working on the background then solving the problem would be as easy as printing out another sheet and starting again. I like that approach and I feel that I may use it more often and yeah, thanks for the idea.

                          I noticed that I can also use this to add a great variety to the drawing. For example, I can set my character in an urban setting, in the jungle, the desert or anywhere else I'd like without having to do the whole drawing all over again, which is great!
                          Glad you found it helpful. It's a process I've been working out for a few years - before that, it was just everything on paper in one go and certain things became a little frustrating. Always re-touching the characters I drew because I had to re-do a background and had to erase a lot of stuff. And then the paper is kind of worn-out as well. Or wishing I'd have placed someone just a little more to the left or made them slightly bigger, etc. I never ink anything until the drawing is all done (blacks and shadows are important), but doing lay-outs with the actual text and the figures already sketched- and then adding the backgrounds, it's made me happier and more productive.

                          I feel it's helped my perspective, too - my stuff is always only 1 or 2 point, but it's then easier to base it around the figures. And being able to print out a smaller size for some backgrounds is a big help, too I think - otherwise some drawings are just too big for my table to do natural-looking perspective, I don't have the space. My stuff isn't exactly spectacular, but these little steps have made it at least more fun to do for me.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Maulsmash View Post
                            This is different from a gel pen, at least it feels different and the white are very white and I haven’t run into it mixing with black ink yet
                            Oh ok, that's good to know. I'll take a look into it and see what happens, it sounds promising, thanks for the information!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by shaw View Post

                              Glad you found it helpful. It's a process I've been working out for a few years - before that, it was just everything on paper in one go and certain things became a little frustrating. Always re-touching the characters I drew because I had to re-do a background and had to erase a lot of stuff. And then the paper is kind of worn-out as well. Or wishing I'd have placed someone just a little more to the left or made them slightly bigger, etc. I never ink anything until the drawing is all done (blacks and shadows are important), but doing lay-outs with the actual text and the figures already sketched- and then adding the backgrounds, it's made me happier and more productive.

                              I feel it's helped my perspective, too - my stuff is always only 1 or 2 point, but it's then easier to base it around the figures. And being able to print out a smaller size for some backgrounds is a big help, too I think - otherwise some drawings are just too big for my table to do natural-looking perspective, I don't have the space. My stuff isn't exactly spectacular, but these little steps have made it at least more fun to do for me.
                              Yeah, I see what you mean. I have the same problem too sometimes, with not having the composition as I like it on the first try. I have to erase things and the paper wears out pretty quickly if erase it a lot. I try to do some thumbnails first to get an idea of what I want, what works and what doesn't. I try out different poses before I actually start to work on a piece and yeah, working the background around the character works fine for me also. Do you ever do any digital adjustments once your drawing is scanned? I get the impression that moving characters over a bit to the right or the left of a page would be something easier done digitally, but I wouldn't know, I have never done digital work before.

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