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  • Artist pay rates

    Sorry if this has been answered a hundred times over, but I'm new here.

    I have a comic book script that I want to submit to publisher, and I'm wondering what the average rate/page is for an artist to do pencils. From looking at various submission guidelines, it looks like I'll need about five pages drawn.

  • #2
    Page rates vary from company to company. Companies like DC and Marvel can have starting page rates that are over $125 a page for pencils. Artists working on bigger titles and who have more of a name get lots more of course. Most smaller companies pay much less. When I worked with Claypool Comics drawing ELVIRA MISTRESS OF THE DARK, I was paid $85/ page for pencils. I thought that was a decent rate, especially considering that Claypool was not a big company. That rate allowed me to put a little extra love and care into the drawing. Even a page rate of $50/ page isn't a horrible price for someone who's looking to do some comic work early in their career. Since it sounds like you're preparing a pitch to a company, you should probably see what your budget is, and then seek out an artist who has skills and abilities you admire. Offer them the best money you can muster, because the five pages for your pitch will be EXTREMELY important in determining whether or not the book will be picked up. The art will most likely make or break your project, so that's something to take into consideration. The reality is that comics cost money to produce, and an sequential artist's need to get paid for what they do. The better the artist is, the more they'll likely be in demand, and the more they'll likely want to receive for their time. My suggestion is to offer a fair page rate to a skilled artist who you think will deliver the kind of book you want. You don't have to break your bank, but be reasonable. Most artists who have spent years developing drawing skills won't want to work for free or for bottom wages. Treat them fair, and show a little appreciation, financially speaking. A pitch is a gamble, and most artists don't like to gamble with their time. They like to get paid for their time and efforts at the drawing desk.

    Hope this has been helpful to you.

    Loston
    Last edited by Bruce Lee; 06-10-2010, 01:05 PM.
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    • #3
      So paying a $80/page rate for an artist that I really like might not be such a bad idea?

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      • #4
        ^Yes, it's not a bad idea. That's just for pencil art. The closer you come to industry standard rates, the better chance of the artist not flaking out on you when a better paying job comes along.
        Last edited by Symson; 06-11-2010, 03:32 AM. Reason: typo
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        • #5
          I've found that most established comic book pencillers won't even look at your script if you're book isn't already solicited. If I was you I would post in the bulliten section. I have found three different artists for three different comics I'm writing all for a lot less than 80 a page. And they are very good artists. Also take into account paying for inking,coloring, and lettering as well.
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          • #6
            But most publishers won't even look at your script unless it has some artwork with it, right?

            Also, since we're talking about submitting ideas to publishers, does anyone have any advice on how to best get a comic published? This is my first stab at selling a comic, if you can't tell.
            Last edited by slafaive; 06-10-2010, 01:47 PM.

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            • #7
              Yeah, you def need art. All I was saying was you could probably hire someone to pencil some pages from your script for cheaper than 80 a page. I know for a fact there a lot of good artists on this board who work for less. They're trying to break in as well. As far as getting a comic published I haven't done that yet. I'm still in the scripting/hiring artists/getting pages done phase.
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              • #8
                I do like the guy's work who's charging $80, but you are right. Considering I'll need inking and lettering (and I'm not independently wealthy), I better not spend it all on pencils.

                So do you know if publishers expect you to work with the artist that you had draw for the submission, or do they just care that you got someone for the time being just to show them your story in motion and you can get someone else later?

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                • #9
                  Fabianran, if you don't mind me asking, how much in total have you had to pay your talent for the pencils, inks, colors, and lettering for five pages of work?

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                  • #10
                    I have no idea about the publisher's needs since I'm just starting out. I only got serious about scripting my stories about three months ago, and then only serious about hiring artists last month.
                    As far as what I personally have spent.. I have three different artists working on three different scripts.

                    One story I'm spending 91 dollars a page(that's pencils, inks, colors, and letters by three different artists) So that's 455 for five pages. This story is actually 8 pages long so my total for this is 728. Wow, I hadn't added it all up like that yet haha but since different artists are on various levels at a time it's not so bad because it's stretched over like a month.
                    Luckily for me I just got the best paying job of my life so I can afford it. It also helps that my wife is very understanding!
                    But yeah, my best advice(and keep in mind I'm just starting out and haven't even been published) is to save up a nice chunk of change and MOST importantly...write, write, write.
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