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  • Private Eye




    Pencil:



    Hi everyone!

    I'm a new guy here but I hope I'll fit in

    A couple of words about this piece:

    I decided to draw something completely from imagination. I tend to overthink my designs, do a lot of sketches, thumbnails etc, but in the end I often quit before I get anywhere. So, this time I thought it would've been a good idea to just start drawing, design and add stuff as I go along, and really see it through, at least until finished inks, however crappy the drawing may be.

    An additional challenge was that I didn't use any photos, tutorials or any type of reference. Purely imagination. I also tried to keep the ruler or templates to a minimum. Sort of a comic book art test

    The reason why there are no shadows, just line art, is that I have a tendency (called laziness) to put a lot of things in shadows so that I don't have to draw them To avoid it, I kept it almost 100% line art (except the head region). Also, I treated the perspective quite loosely, I wanted it to be dynamic rather than correct.

    I'd really like to improve my drawing skills so any comments more than welcome, even nitpicking

  • #2
    careful. You're trench coat is too flowy. More like a robe, less like a trench coat. Your perspective is pretty good until you get to the head and torso, then you lose it a little. the right foot seems tiny based on the perspective and angle.
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    • #3
      Thanks for the comments! I still struggle with applying correct perspective to the figure. And I often have a problem with feet being too small. My brain just refuses to see their true size

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      • #4
        well you did choose a really drastic vanishing point. If you draw a line from the vanishing point to the shoulder, you should see how drastic the angle is for the opposite shoulder, were he to be standing straight with both shoulders parallel to the ground. If you use those same vanishing points and draw a cube around his head, you'll see the proper tilt as well.

        As for the trench coat, check your references. You should see that the folds are a little more stiffer, even angular in places.
        Check out Film Grouch!

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        • #5
          There's some promising stuff here and you've obviously put in some degree of study but, in all kindness, if a little knowledge is a dangerous thing you know just enough to kill us all. There's no such thing as 8 point perspective with multiple horizons and your use of it leaves your city falling over and the car sliding off down the hill. We're seconds away from the city crumbling to dust.

          While gender norms have shifted greatly over my lifetime, unless there's a reason otherwise, I'd suggest men's clothing rather than women's. That is a woman's hat. A man's coat, shirt, pants should be left over right not right over left. A man's belt goes around the waist above the hips rather than halfway down the bum like a Roaring 20's flapper.

          Perspective is two arbitrary choices and everything else is carved in stone. If you want to wing your perspective start with two things, any two will do, and go from there. I choose your car (as it's the best part of the drawing) IF the front of the car is true AND the side of the car is true (and they are because I damn well said so. Stop laughing! Honest, that's the rule) THEN the horizon and VPs are now carved in stone. Subject all other elements to those two decisions and you'll be OK.
          PaulMartinSmith

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          • #6
            As I've said, I specifically didn't use reference to make some issues more apparent and I guess my total lack of fashion sense is worse than I've suspected Thanks for pointing that out, I didn't even think about what goes over what to be honest, I was just happy that I drew something from imagination which looks like clothes.

            I guess I have approached the perspective a bit too haphazardly this time. I usually create a very elaborate grid, even freehand, and often it slows me down tremendously as I try to calculate every little thing in the drawing. This in turn leads to me not finishing the work at all. I wanted to loosen up a bit and not spend excessive amounts of time on measuring. I need to strike a balance somehow.

            Thanks for the comment, it really gives me stuff to think about

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            • #7
              Originally posted by SebastianSz View Post
              As I've said, I specifically didn't use reference to make some issues more apparent and I guess my total lack of fashion sense is worse than I've suspected Thanks for pointing that out, I didn't even think about what goes over what to be honest, I was just happy that I drew something from imagination which looks like clothes.
              Clothing and how its worn is important. It helps create the 'suspension of disbelief' which makes your 2D illusion FEEL real. Little details can throw the viewer off, kicking them out of the illusion.

              Originally posted by SebastianSz View Post
              I guess I have approached the perspective a bit too haphazardly this time. I usually create a very elaborate grid, even freehand, and often it slows me down tremendously as I try to calculate every little thing in the drawing. This in turn leads to me not finishing the work at all. I wanted to loosen up a bit and not spend excessive amounts of time on measuring. I need to strike a balance somehow.
              Having a strong foundation, perspective and proportion, can make the process quicker. If you decide to, how long would it take you to correct this piece?
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              • #8
                Originally posted by Veritas71 View Post
                Clothing and how its worn is important. It helps create the 'suspension of disbelief' which makes your 2D illusion FEEL real. Little details can throw the viewer off, kicking them out of the illusion.
                If knowing only so easily translated into doing... But next time I'll be more careful with clothing. Hopefully. It's so much easier to fake a spaceship than a damn coat

                Originally posted by Veritas71 View Post
                Having a strong foundation, perspective and proportion, can make the process quicker. If you decide to, how long would it take you to correct this piece?
                Frankly speaking, I don't know. When I consider a piece flawed I just discard it rather than work on it further. Now that I think about it maybe it's not that good an idea. I like to think that of all things, perspective is the one I get. I spent almost a year total drawing freehand geometry on a course preparing for architecture studies. It was sometime ago but we did a lot of exercises such as drawing two dodecahedrons joined by one plane and then their mirror reflection, crossed cylinders and the like, with everything measured but without using rulers. 3D modelling on paper, in other words. But because of that I often spend so much time on geometry that I get too frustrated to finish the piece. That's why I decided to treat it more expressively this time, which is by no means an excuse for screwing up perspective

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by SebastianSz View Post

                  When I consider a piece flawed I just discard it rather than work on it further.
                  Sometimes it's best to let things die a natural death and move on. You're only as good (or bad) as your last drawing. Do another piece and THAT's your last drawing and this one is gone and forgotten.

                  Just keep your nose to the grindstone until perspective becomes your native tongue rather than a foreign language. What you have shows you're getting there, just keep at it.

                  As Veritas says, the little things are killers. The average viewer will have no idea what is wrong or why but, the uneducated, animal portion of their brain will sense the falsity and reject it in an "uncanny valley" kinda way.

                  Great start. Keep plugging, keep posting.
                  PaulMartinSmith

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