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  • oil painting

    white tiger in the black forest
    Pummel
    MiddleWeight
    Win: 1 Loss: 0 KO: 1



    -the man without a name-

  • #2
    Pretty kitty.
    Anyone wanna hear about the Save-a-Kitty Foundation, anyone?

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    • #3
      How about the Save-Me-From-the-Kitty Foundation?

      This painting has some nice, quiet qualities to it. Like that quiet right before the siberian tiger leaps onto you and empties your steaming bowels onto the snow

      I'm interested in some things about this painting. I notice your colors are very thin, and almost have a watercolor-like quality. How did you get that effect?

      Also, I notice that over the whole painting you can see the weave of the canvas peeking through and breaking up the color. Is that an intentional choice you made, and if so, why?

      As for critiques, the eye of the tiger (cue music) is slightly low on its right side (our left). You wany to look at the feet and try to build up some soft tones/highlights of the snow around the paw as it sinks into the snow, giving the illusion that the tiger is actually inside that environment and not just superimposed on it. The shadow beneath the tiger has some interesting things going on inside it, suggesting the uneven ground beneath the snow, which is good. But I wouldn't connect the shadow to the tiger's raised paw on its right side. If it's up in the air like that, going by the other shadows you've established, there should be white, unshaded snow beneath that paw.

      I'm taking a second look at it... you may want to revisit the whole shadow under the animal. In the places where the paws are touching the ground, the shadow should be considerably darker. You have some spots where the same pure white of the snow in the background is standing between the paws and the ground. The thing is standing IN the snow, so connect those shadows to its feet. Also, you want to add some reflected light onto the shading on the tiger's feet. The shadow should be darkest where the light and shadow meet on the bits of the legs closest to us, and lighter as the shapes curve away from us. The white snow on the ground will lighten up the shadows on the feet. You might also check the anatomy of the back paws.

      Last, get rid of that black outline of the tree in the foreground on our right. There's no reason for a defined black line to exist on that snow-covered tree. Distinguish it from the background using a contrast between background and foreground tones, and further distinguish it by indicating some of the texture of the snow on the tree.

      Hope this isn't too heavy-handed. I think you're off to a great start, and it'd be nice to see this painting progress into something truly great.

      Keep up the good work!

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      • #4
        amazing, a great critique! ill take all that in and see if i can adjust any of what you told me without damaging the painting. as far as the watercolor feel, its just the way it came out. maybe it has to do with the fact that i work mostly with watercolor and the style just passed over... i dunno, i dont have formal training and i just wing it most of the time. the texture of the canvas just shows because most of the white is untouched canvas and the oils are pretty thin on the canvas... oh and the eye was my biggest problem with the painting, it drove me crazy for like 2 hours trying to fix it and it still came out bad imo thanx for the crits
        Pummel
        MiddleWeight
        Win: 1 Loss: 0 KO: 1



        -the man without a name-

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        • #5
          I suspected that you'd painted on the canvas directly. A lot of times, people with prime their canvas by putting a layer of gesso over it before painting. This evens out the underlayer so you have a smooth surface to paint on. Another thing you can do is stain the gesso layer with a light undertone to establish a base color/ medium value to work off of. It'll show through in places where your paint is thinner and add a depth and unity to the painting.

          So, if you re-did this painting or another one like it, you might make a really light gray or blue mixture (some combination of a cool blue and titanium white) and stain the gesso with it first. You'd mix tiny amounts of the paints in with mineral spirits or turpentine, swish it all around until you get a really watery, transluscent mix, then do a wash over your gesso. Let that dry for a day, then start your painting on top of it.

          One difference between oil and watercolor is that you can paint layers over layers of oil and not screw it up. From what I understand, watercolor is a less-is-more kind of medium, whereas oil you build up stuff. For example, you don't need the white of the canvas to create highlights on forms like in watercolor. You can paint white highlights directly onto your colors.

          I think you could keep adding layers of paint to this and it would be fine.

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          • #6
            only thing bothering me is where the snow on the trees and the bark seperate from eash other. it seems to much like a line was drawn there. i dont know, i havnt seen the refference if there is one. it also looks like you just left the canvas blank on the white spots. if you did its a bad habit. the white actualy needs to be painted on, it will make thins look a lot nicer. also like m. ellis said, the paint seems really thin.
            'None of you understand. I'm not locked up in here with you. You're locked up in here with me' -Rorschach

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