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  • Batman Portrait

    Started as a rough gesture drawing, then I decided to render it out in pencil. From there I went overboard in PhotoShop. I was trying to stay pretty close to the original 1939 design for the costume. Larger version at DeviantArt: Batman Portrait



    Composited pencil version of the above
    Batman © DC Comics


  • #2
    Some anatomy issues. Biggest are his right arm and left eye. The right hand is turned towards the body. The right bicep would follow, instead it looks more turned away from the body. The left eye seems to be on a diagonal, rising up and out. So his eye socked would be where his brow line should be. Could be a style thing, but then the right eye doesn't follow suite.

    I like the shading on the cowl and cape. Has a good understanding of shape and lighting.
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    • #3
      It seems to me the problems I have are all in accurately visualising the figure in forced perspective. With the head, this was a first try at that particular style of Batman cowl, which, as it turns out, really complicated my ability to envision and depict the underlying facial features. I really don't know how to correct these deficiencies except to strictly use references, and/or to just keep trying. I DO find that the more I struggle with something, the closer I get to rendering it accurately. Thanks for the look and critique.

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      • #4
        Yes, use reference whenever you can.
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        • #5
          Originally posted by yomark View Post
          It seems to me the problems I have are all in accurately visualising the figure in forced perspective.
          I'm not sure if you mean forced perspective.

          Forced perspective is a technique that employs optical illusion to make an object appear farther away, closer, larger or smaller than it actually is. It is used primarily in photography, filmmaking and architecture. It manipulates human visual perception through the use of scaled objects and the correlation between them and the vantage point of the spectator or camera.

          This is just a picture of Batman standing alone - from the point of view of someone roughly the same height as the subject.
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          • #6
            Originally posted by Beastie View Post
            I'm not sure if you mean forced perspective.
            I'm no more sure of the term to express what I mean than I am in employing the technique. When I spoke of "fore-shortening" about my "pencil master" drawing, someone suggested I meant forced-perspective. In both cases, I was trying to depict the nearer parts of the figure as closer to the viewer, thus (perhaps exaggertedly) larger. This is something I continue to struggle with, and I'm even open to the suggestion that I'm completely out in left-field about it.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by yomark View Post
              I'm no more sure of the term to express what I mean than I am in employing the technique. When I spoke of "fore-shortening" about my "pencil master" drawing, someone suggested I meant forced-perspective. In both cases, I was trying to depict the nearer parts of the figure as closer to the viewer, thus (perhaps exaggertedly) larger. This is something I continue to struggle with, and I'm even open to the suggestion that I'm completely out in left-field about it.
              Ok, well, with this in mind, I'd have to say what I did last time. You're not exploring the idea of forseshortening enough with the poses you choose.

              IN this kind of picture, Batman is standing slightly side-on to the viewer -- and you're obviously thinking about how that means one of his arms will be slightly closer to us than the other. The thing is, the difference in distance is SO slight -- that the foreshortening becomes minimal at best.

              You need to sketch out some characters who are throwing punches towards the viewer. The kind of pic where the fist is bigger than the character's head kinda thing.

              Or maybe draw a character 'diving away' from the viewer.

              Drawing someone standing still, with their arms at the side - from a 'head-height' view - is not going to really going to help you get into and understand foreshortening.
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              • #8
                Also, if you type in 'Comic Book foreshortening tutorial' to Google - you'll get tons of online guides and tricks to start you off and help you get a feel for it.

                Its a difficult thing to get to grips with though - so don't ever get disheartened.
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Beastie View Post
                  Its a difficult thing to get to grips with though - so don't ever get disheartened.
                  Always appreciate your feedback. And thanks for taking the time to critique me.

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