Page 46 of 64 FirstFirst ... 3642434445464748495056 ... LastLast
Results 451 to 460 of 631

Thread: Ask Loston (Dr. Stupid Jr)...

  1. #451
    [SUPPORTER] Bruce Lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    14,488
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Ugga Bugga View Post
    Loston, who is your favorite seventies era magician from Canada?
    Hmmm. Tough one. I guess it would have to be Douglas James Henning.









    http://www.lostonwallace.com
    http://lostonwallace.deviantart.com


    I HAVE A NEW WEBSITE NOW!! FINALLY!! SHOW ME SOME LOVE, & CHECK IT OUT:
    http://www.lostonwallace.com

  2. #452
    [SUPPORTER] Bruce Lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    14,488
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Miller View Post
    Thanks, Amadarwin, I guess I missed that! I'll try leaving some shampoo on a brush overnight and see if I can save myself $30-50.
    @ Amadarwin: Thanks for playing safety for me, Dave! Appreciate it, bud!

    @Ian: Let your brush sit for three days, Ian, just to give the repair a fair chance. Lots of shampoo and conditioner, and make sure the point is reformed when you set it up to sit for the duration.
    http://www.lostonwallace.com
    http://lostonwallace.deviantart.com


    I HAVE A NEW WEBSITE NOW!! FINALLY!! SHOW ME SOME LOVE, & CHECK IT OUT:
    http://www.lostonwallace.com

  3. #453
    I just found PJ about 2 weeks ago. I had one specific question for you and one "in general" question about the forum I figured you could answer.

    Specific question is, do you have any tips/tuts for dealing with forshortening or perspective as it relates to the figure? Example of what I mean would be for instance a view looking down at a figure where it tapers smaller and smaller ( head is big, feet small) etc. For some reason to me, mine end up looking incorrect as if it were just a weird figure with distorted features.

    In General Question: Does this forum only allow comic book type art? I do caricature/illustration type work and I didn't know if it fit in here. But I've always loved comic book art for its line work etc and want to incorporate some of that in my stuff.

    Thanks.

  4. #454
    [SUPPORTER] Bruce Lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    14,488
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Nickelhead View Post
    I just found PJ about 2 weeks ago. I had one specific question for you and one "in general" question about the forum I figured you could answer.

    Specific question is, do you have any tips/tuts for dealing with forshortening or perspective as it relates to the figure? Example of what I mean would be for instance a view looking down at a figure where it tapers smaller and smaller (head is big, feet small) etc. For some reason to me, mine end up looking incorrect as if it were just a weird figure with distorted features.

    In General Question: Does this forum only allow comic book type art? I do caricature/illustration type work and I didn't know if it fit in here. But I've always loved comic book art for its line work etc and want to incorporate some of that in my stuff.

    Thanks.
    First off, welcome to PJ, Nickelhead!

    -To answer your first question about foreshortening the figure, I do have one good tip. I'll post this Rocketeer drawing that I did a couple years back for the sake of visual reference:



    My tip is to always draw from foreground to background when you draw a foreshortened figure. In the case of the Rocketeer drawing above, I started out by drawing his left hand first, because it's the object closest to the viewer. Then I drew his left forearm, then his left bicep/tricep area, followed by his left shoulder. Then I drew his head (Helmet), then his torso, then his right arm, then his abdomen, etc. All the while, I kept in mind that as the objects that make up his body get further away from the viewer, then need to get smaller and taper. This might sound like an obvious tip, but you'd be surprised how many artists get this wrong. They start in the background or middle ground and then leap to the foreground or vice-versa. If you do that, you're stuck trying to make areas meet in the middle, which is tough to do. Often if you work that way, you'll find that you won't have left yourself enough room to draw in the middle parts of an arm, or whatever. By starting from the front and working backwards, one stage at a time, you give yourself room to plan and rework things if necessary. When I drew this Rocketeer piece, the dynamic foreshortening was not referenced. It's all from my head. It works because I understand human anatomy and I used the front to back method I just described. It sure makes drawing figures in perspective a lot easier when you work from front to back. Leaping around generally will spell disaster, so I don't recommend that.

    As for as the anatomy shapes goes, it just takes practice to get the shapes right from certain angles. There are a few books on foreshortening the figure out there. If you like books with photos of models, this one is decent. A lot of photos of people stretched out on the floor, etc:

    http://www.amazon.com/Atlas-Foreshor...9607797&sr=8-1

    This book is a good, general all-purpose anatomy book that's inexpensive and might be of some help too:
    http://www.amazon.com/Human-Figure-A...9607920&sr=1-2

    The Human Figure book is an illustrated book, but the illustrations are accurate, and often show the human anatomy from different POVs and angles. Here's a few example pages from inside:




    The best thing to keep in mind is that foreshortening a figure takes practice. The more experience you have doing it, the better you're likely going to be at it. Don't be afraid to study photographs for reference if necessary. Take a few photos of friends reaching out towards the camera, etc, and study the images. That'll honestly be helpful to you, I think. Of course nothing beats taking life drawing classes. That's the best way to figure out figure work in general.

    -As for your second question, that's really one for the PJ SUPPORT & INFORMATION board. I could give you my ideas/opinions/understandings on the subject, but that wouldn't be an official answer as I'm no longer a moderator on PJ. That being the case, your question should really be addressed to this sub forum, Nickelhead: http://www.penciljack.com/forum/foru...mp-Information

    Anyway, I hope I helped you a little with the foreshortening question.
    http://www.lostonwallace.com
    http://lostonwallace.deviantart.com


    I HAVE A NEW WEBSITE NOW!! FINALLY!! SHOW ME SOME LOVE, & CHECK IT OUT:
    http://www.lostonwallace.com

  5. #455
    Thanks. I'm pretty good with anatomy when I have reference I got my BFA about a year ago. But I think thats also what's hurting me because of such structured classic "academic" drawing now when I try to pull from imagination I find it harder. Any tips for improving imagination? lol I can nail references but unless I can teach my wife to fly it might be hard to set up some of the photographs.

    Appreciate you taking your time to answer. I read "David wasting paper" blog and seen your work and thought it was awesome so I tracked you down here.

  6. #456
    [SUPPORTER] Bruce Lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    14,488
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Nickelhead View Post
    Thanks. I'm pretty good with anatomy when I have reference I got my BFA about a year ago. But I think thats also what's hurting me because of such structured classic "academic" drawing now when I try to pull from imagination I find it harder. Any tips for improving imagination? lol I can nail references but unless I can teach my wife to fly it might be hard to set up some of the photographs.

    Appreciate you taking your time to answer. I read "David wasting paper" blog and seen your work and thought it was awesome so I tracked you down here.
    Ah! Very cool. Glad to see you her on PJ!
    http://www.lostonwallace.com
    http://lostonwallace.deviantart.com


    I HAVE A NEW WEBSITE NOW!! FINALLY!! SHOW ME SOME LOVE, & CHECK IT OUT:
    http://www.lostonwallace.com

  7. #457
    Member Lonrott's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    225
    I am not sure if you have spoke of this...but Alex Raymond vs Alex Toth? Which one do you like...and why? Just curious...

  8. #458
    [SUPPORTER] Bruce Lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    14,488
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Lonrott View Post
    I am not sure if you have spoke of this...but Alex Raymond vs Alex Toth? Which one do you like...and why? Just curious...
    I couldn't possibly pick one over the other. Both were brilliant.
    http://www.lostonwallace.com
    http://lostonwallace.deviantart.com


    I HAVE A NEW WEBSITE NOW!! FINALLY!! SHOW ME SOME LOVE, & CHECK IT OUT:
    http://www.lostonwallace.com

  9. #459
    I'm the LORD of the HARVEST! The P.R. Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    a.k.a. Lefty Enright
    Posts
    2,831
    Blog Entries
    1
    hey man, I got offered a gig doing caricatures at a graduation party in a couple of weeks, and was hoping you had some brilliant tips you could offer me.

    I've always enjoyed watching them done at theme parks, but other than doing realistic portraits have never really tried my hand at them. the rest of this month i'm imposing a crash course on myself.

    been checking out Tom Richmond's blog HERE, but I know you've got a way of just beaming your experience directly into my brain, right? you've just been holding out on us all ^__^

    gonna post a thread in the tips and tricks section as well, but I'd sure appreciate your insight
    P.R. Scholtz
    Tumblr
    DeviantArt
    Twitter
    My Wife can beat up your Dad

  10. #460
    [SUPPORTER] Bruce Lee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    14,488
    Blog Entries
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by The P.R. Man View Post
    hey man, I got offered a gig doing caricatures at a graduation party in a couple of weeks, and was hoping you had some brilliant tips you could offer me.

    I've always enjoyed watching them done at theme parks, but other than doing realistic portraits have never really tried my hand at them. the rest of this month i'm imposing a crash course on myself.

    been checking out Tom Richmond's blog HERE, but I know you've got a way of just beaming your experience directly into my brain, right? you've just been holding out on us all ^__^

    gonna post a thread in the tips and tricks section as well, but I'd sure appreciate your insight
    Draw with markers or brush pens. Something that will give you nice, flowing lines with energy and spontaneity. Pitt brushpens, prisma colors and copics were well for Caricature work. I like to draw on bristol board, but ledger and marker paper works well too. Be sure to bring all the equipment you're going to need. Ask in advance if the client is going to supply you with
    1) a table and chair
    2) adequate light
    3) food or beverage
    DON'T ASSUME that the client knows to provide these things!!

    Make sure you have a watch. Leave when you're supposed to, and stay later only if you are going to receive overtime pay. If you're in the middle of a drawing, make it your last one, and let people know it is. Otherwise, you'll never get home.

    The idea of caricature is to exaggerate a person's features in an effort to poke a little fun at them. It's like a distorted portrait. Caricatures are supposed to be fun, and that's the idea. That said, here's something to consider...

    ...don't assume everyone has a sense of humor. A lot of people can't laugh at themselves. Often, people can be a little insecure about the way they actually look, so my advice is to not go too far with things. My personal experience is that most men don't mind it if a caricature artist has a little fun at their expense, but that's not always true of women. On several occasions I've found that women and young girls don't respond very well to humor at their expense, so when I draw a caricature of a female, I usually try not to draw anything offensive or unflattering. I'll usually try to flatter them instead. I'll exaggerate eyelashes, down play the size of a girl's nose, etc. While it is kind of a double standard to have, I find that it also is what makes people happy. At the end of the day, that's what a caricature artist is being paid to do, so try not to consider people's feelings just a bit. Keep the kids cute, the ladies pretty, and give the men hell.

    You might be able to contact Bathill for a few pointers also. He's done a lot of caricature work, so he might have some pointers for you too.
    http://www.lostonwallace.com
    http://lostonwallace.deviantart.com


    I HAVE A NEW WEBSITE NOW!! FINALLY!! SHOW ME SOME LOVE, & CHECK IT OUT:
    http://www.lostonwallace.com

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •