Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: help with Crow quill pens

  1. #1

    help with Crow quill pens

    I checked around pj, and a few of the inking tutorial links are broken.
    After googling, I didn't find much info.

    Anyway, I started inking with micron pens, then was told to try brushes.

    I still can't afford that #7 sable brush or whatever it's called, so today I got a some nibs (c-02 I think...they're pretty thin) and a nib holder.
    (for about $5 total)

    Problem:
    The nib sometimes seems as if it's digging into the paper.
    Also, the ink seems to get applied thicker tha when I used a brush and takes longer to dry (if that's a problem)..

    Other quesions:
    To use it, do I just dip the tip of the pen in the ink?
    Or the entire nib (ink seems to hold more when I do it that way, but it's messier).

    I'm guessin' that like the brush, I just have to get used to a new tool again.

    Any other advice appreciated.

  2. #2
    Not Spoiling for a Fight Pencilero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Under a Rock.
    Posts
    4,958
    Problem:
    The nib sometimes seems as if it's digging into the paper.
    Also, the ink seems to get applied thicker tha when I used a brush and takes longer to dry (if that's a problem)..
    Do not hold the pen like a standard writing pen. You always want to be sure the nib flare is parallel to the page as you draw. Try to keep the pen angled about 45 degrees or so. It will take some practice learning how to hold it, just don't hold it at a 90 degree angle. The pen will be more prone to digging into the page, and ink will run like mad.

    Work around your freshly inked areas, of use a hair dryer to speed the drying process. Just be careful not to use too high a power and potentially blow the ink away from the line, making a mess.

    Other quesions:
    To use it, do I just dip the tip of the pen in the ink?
    Or the entire nib (ink seems to hold more when I do it that way, but it's messier).
    I try to dip up to the base of where the nib becomes a barrel.

    A sort of wasteful, but useful tip I found is to keep a splatter page handy, taped to your table - dip your nib, then shake off the excess ink onto the splatter page gently. You just want the overflow to come off, not dry out the nib.

    You can also whack the pen against your ink jar, but throwing the ink from the pen also seems to aid in proper flow.

    Just take your time.

    Also keep a razor blade and candle or lighter handy. You'll want to scrape residue off of the nib as it accumulates, or burn fibers out.

    I hope that helps.

    Good luck!

    Na razie,

    Greg
    New and improved for 1996!
    Instagram: Pencilero

  3. #3
    A speedball C2? That nib is only good for lettering and inking borders. Most people use the Hunt 102 and 108.

  4. #4
    You can buy nibs off ebay dirt cheep you just gotta know which ones are good. You might want to buy a bic lighter so you can burn the oil off the pen nibs. Otherwise too much ink is deposited at one time. I tired Hunt 102s but only liked using them on bainbridge illustration board.

  5. #5
    This is a problem I have been wrestling with for a long time. Here is what works for me; it may or may not work for you:

    First off, start with the hunt 107. They are the easiest to use, and last the longest, but have the least line variation. But, it's the best tool with which to learn. When you feel confident, switch to a hunt 102. I personally don't like 108's, but if you really want to use them, wait until you've mastered the 102, as I think the 108 is the most difficult of the three. My understanding is that most artists use the 102. (And brushes, and rapidographs.)

    Secondly, other than keeping the nib flanges parallel to the page, try not to "think" about what you're doing. To draw any line, put the pen down at the start of the line, then look at the end of the line, then quickly draw the line. Yes, do this even on curves. Practice doing this. DON'T use a lot of pressure. In fact, don't use ANY pressure (at first). Think of the tip as sliding just above the surface. I like to rest the pen on my middle finger, and my middle finger on the page, then imagine that I'm drawing with my middle finger, instead of the pen.

    Thirdly, the "paper" you use matters. I find that the best stuff is strathmore 500 bristol board (not paper), plate or vellum. You can get the stuff in pads from bluelinepro.com or dickblick.com. It's expensive, but you gotta pay to play. If you're going to use anything other than strathmore 500, you should probably use plate, as the lesser quality vellums (in my experience) get seriously messy when the nib digs into them.

    Fourthly, the ink matters as well. I like the rapidograph universal black ink.

    Keep the paper flat. I don't know how others do this, but I tape the bristol board onto an art board.

    Other than that, just practice practice practice.

  6. #6
    Well if you've got nibs that start in C- then you've got calligraphy nibs, not sketch nibs (which are the ones you need and are only in numbers, no C in front of them). This is also why so much ink is coming off it, it's designed to flow for lettering.

    Like the guys suggested, get the #102, #107, and #108 nibs, and make sure you have the small brown nibholder. The 102 is an all around inking nib for illustration, and best for detail too. The 107 doesn't bend, and is best for straight lines like panel borders. And the 108 is REALLY flexible and if you're not careful, can leave a lot of ink behind if you press too much.

    To avoid bending or breaking the nibs, laying down too much ink, and other small problems, take a scrap piece of the paper you're using and practice your pressure, strokes, lineweight, etc. Once you get into the hang of using the right amount of pressure you should be okay.

    As for paper, I've found Strathmore 300 smooth (I buy it in the 14x17" pads) to be the best and I use it in inking comic pages. I just got some EON boards though, haven't tried them but they seem to have the same consistency. And all my sketchbooks are Strathmore 300 or 400 smooth because it's great for pencilling and inking. And to keep the nib from digging in: Practice like I suggested above, and you'll learn not to press too hard
    Diana Greenhalgh, Inker/Illustrator
    Facebook
    DeviantArt Gallery

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •