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    Modesto, CA 1979 EddieChingLives's Avatar
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    Storytelling 101

    DISCLAIMER: THIS IS NOT THE PENCILJACK OFFICIAL CLASS ON STORYTELLING. THIS IS MY PERSONAL TIPS THAT I'VE DISCOVERED OVER TIME AND I FEEL LIKE SHARING. SO IF YOU DON'T LIKE THIS THREAD, IT'S OK. JUST DON'T BLAME THE FOLKS AT PENCILJACK, OK. BLAME ME.

    Ok. This is my attempt to let you in on what I've learned through studying comic books for years. Hopefully, it can be something to think about the next time you open a comic book.

    Using MS Paint, I can illistrate examples of what I am ranting about.

    Let's first talk about panel divisions.



    Four ways people setup comic book panels. These are the basic puzzle pieces that make up comic books.

    The horizontal panel is used by many nowdays. They just divide the page using only horizontal panels. Mark Texaria is only one example I can think about that uses this type of layout. The advantage is that it is similar to the aspect ratio you get when you see a movie.

    Equally divisioned panels are also common. Most common in older comics. Jack Kirby use to have his pages with the panels allready printed on them. That way he didn't have to draw them. This is also effective because each panel stands alone. No panel stands out alone in this sequence. Each panel gets the same attension.

    Sometimes panels get greedy though. They want more attension, so they have to get more space than other panels get. This is good if you want a particular moment in the story to stand out.

    The horizontal and vertical divisions are commenly used by Manga artists. Adam Warren uses this type of sequence a lot. Sometimes you need a taller panel to excentuate the height of a building or room. Sometimes it can just help keep a page fresh.

    The insert panel I've most commonly seen in the Kubert Family. Joe Kubert uses this especially in his Tor comic. It's good for when you want to go into a close-up of something allready in the shot.

    These are just the main puzzle pieces folks. I will continue to disect comics in this thread. Hopefully this is informative for some of you.

    I plan to go into further detail on subjects such as:

    using the pieces to complete a page

    panel to panel flow

    panel to panel do's and don'ts

    typical breakdowns

    ploting pages
    Last edited by EddieChingLives; 04-17-2011 at 05:15 PM.

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