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Thread: Courses/Books, etc for Leaning to Write Comics

  1. #1
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    Courses/Books, etc for Leaning to Write Comics

    I am looking for any avenues that will help me write comics. I recently purchased The Art Of Comic Book Writing by Mark Kneece and having been reading that. The edit done by Steven Forbes on my script was eye opening and gut wrenching. He was kind but honest in his feedback of the script. I am rewriting it (5th time) and sending it back to him, but I would like to learn as much as I can without spending an arm and a leg.

    Also, If anyone has done the Comics Experience courses I would love to hear your feedback.

    James

  2. #2
    James, I learned a lot, early on, from reading The DC Guide to Writing Comics by Denny O'Neil. Bendis wrote a book as well, which I've been meaning to check out. Getting in-depth edits sting a bit but pain is growth. Stick with it.

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    @Shaun I will pick up the DC guide. I was trying to decide what to read next so that is the next on then.

    The edit was hard to read but I know that I am so new and that it was not perfect. I have learned so much already and spent last night and this afternoon rewriting the script. We’ll see what Steven says!

  4. #4
    Best $34 you'll spend on writing comics, though I admittedly may be bias O

    http://nickmacari.com/comic-writers-guide/
    http://nickmacari.com/storycraft-for-comics/


    O'neils book is staple reading, as are the McCloud books (although McCloud's aren't focused solely on writing--as far as I know).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by panelup View Post
    Best $34 you'll spend on writing comics, though I admittedly may be bias O

    http://nickmacari.com/comic-writers-guide/
    http://nickmacari.com/storycraft-for-comics/


    O'neils book is staple reading, as are the McCloud books (although McCloud's aren't focused solely on writing--as far as I know).
    Thank you so much. Buying them NOW!

    Just curious why are you biased?
    Last edited by jamesdcreviston; 03-20-2017 at 09:09 PM.

  6. #6
    @jamescreviston Bias because they're my books James
    But all the reviews on Amazon and the site are real, so I don't think you'll be disappointed.

    I'm sure you've only skimmed through them... What's your initial impression?
    Last edited by panelup; 03-21-2017 at 01:31 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by panelup View Post
    @jamescreviston Bias because they're my books James
    But all the reviews on Amazon and the site are real, so I don't think you'll be disappointed.

    I'm sure you've only skimmed through them... What's your initial impression?
    I have only skimmed them but I am about 16 pages into the Writers Guide To Storycaft Comics, and I can see it applying to more than comics (Besides being a comedian, I also write TV and Film scripts). It is similar so far to Save The Cat by Blake Snyder, but after I read them I will give reviews on Amazon for you.

  8. #8
    Appreciate you taking the time to review after you're done. Really, thanks on that!

    And yes, Storycraft for Comics is applicable to any story, though the overall approach of the book is comic focused . (I use it for comics, video game scripts, novels and screenplays.) I think I mention, McKee, Snyder, Campbell, O'Neil and a few others in it. When you read all the various (and useful) treatise on writing, there are of course similarities. Every good story has to have a Master Theme for example and there's only so many ways to explain that. Same thing with discovery, structuring, archetypes, character arcs etc. While writers all explain their approach and outlook different, at the end of the day we're all describing how to build the same house—four walls and a roof.
    Though you're probably ahead of the writing curve than most newer comic writers (having read a good number of screenplay writing books or classes) I think you'll find a lot of value in Storycraft for comics when you're done, if nothing but as a condensed, thorough refresher and reference.

    The Writer's Guide talks strictly comic script production.
    That was actually the first one of the series. I wasn't actually planning on writing Storycraft, because so many other books on general story writing and structure exist. But since the Writer's Guide release so many people asked for it, I said okie doke, and threw my hat in the ring.
    Last edited by panelup; 03-22-2017 at 01:32 PM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by panelup View Post
    Appreciate you taking the time to review after your done. Really, thanks on that!

    And yes, Storycraft for Comics is applicable to any story, though the overall approach of the book is comic focused . (I use it for comics, video game scripts, novels and screenplays.) I think I mention, McKee, Snyder, Campbell, O'Neil and a few others in it. When you read all the various (and useful) treatise on writing, there are of course similarities. Every good story has to have a Master Theme for example and there's only so many ways to explain that. Same thing with discovery, structuring, archetypes, character arcs etc. While writers all explain their approach and outlook different, at the end of the day we're all describing how to build the same house—four walls and a roof.
    Though you're probably ahead of the writing curve than most newer comic writers (having read a good number of screenplay writing books or classes) I think you'll find a lot of value in Storycraft for comics when you're done, if nothing but as a condensed, thorough refresher and reference.

    The Writer's Guide talks strictly comic script production.
    That was actually the first one of the series. I wasn't actually planning on writing Storycraft, because so many other books on general story writing and structure exist. But since the Writer's Guide release so many people asked for it, I said okie doke, and threw my hat in the ring.
    I am mostly concerned with format as Steven Forbes was kind enough to point out that my format was off. It was also pointed out here although I write everything in Fade In (Like Final Draft style software) when it is exported as PDF it all looks good. Thank you for taking time to respond and write these books. I may try to pick your brain again soon.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shaun View Post
    James, I learned a lot, early on, from reading The DC Guide to Writing Comics by Denny O'Neil. Bendis wrote a book as well, which I've been meaning to check out. Getting in-depth edits sting a bit but pain is growth. Stick with it.
    I read the DC book but not a lot of laying out script format. It was more of whatever works, works. Kind of disappointing. I am enjoying The Art Of Comic Book Writing by Mark Kneece as well as both books by Nick Macari, worth the $34, although if you just wanted script writing guidelines I would only pick up The Working Writers Guide to Comics and Graphic Novels.

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