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Thread: Webcomic Sequentials, Sample Art

  1. #1

    Webcomic Sequentials, Sample Art

    This is a sample piece I am finishing for a webcomic. Hoping to have colors finished soon.

    Any critiques are welcome, trying to refine my process, currently getting used to checking the scale of everything. Any useful tips would be great, thanks.


  2. #2
    hey dude! I tried to write this up at like 3 AM last night on mobile, got a few paragraphs into it and then accidnetally backed out and it all got lost xD so imma try again!

    Pn1 im seeing some issues with the right arm and the torso area of the kid running up, specifically where the two meet but that whoel region could use another pass, the Dresser being so solid and neat really draws the eye from the less precise lines of the brothers (?) it doesnt look real, in part because it looks a lil TOO perfect.

    I like the angle/view of pn 3.

    Definately some proportion distortion going on in Pn 4, im no expert but i think it could benefit from moving the vanishing point a lil farther from the panel then it is now and rewording it. The Kneeling Tired kid also seems to be rolling a littlebit to his right in an odd way and im not sure his legs are properly portioned or placed, he looks abit off. (Though i cant do a draw over or anything because i couldnt managed that pose off the top of my head its a pretty tough one!)

    Pn 5 there is something super off the the dynamic of this panel, the brother in the wheel chair shouldnt be almost as tall as the dresser, and unless the other kid is still kneeling down shouldn't be as tall as his brother/the other kid.

    But as just a moment before even the kid with the better reach could BARELY reach the top of that dresser.

    I think you could benefit from some line weights in this page in general to seperate out details and keep things from being too flat.
    Last edited by BasiliskOnline; 03-19-2017 at 09:27 PM.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by nsterken View Post
    ... currently getting used to checking the scale of everything...
    We'll get to scale in a second. Because story is everything, let's start there (and pretend you've explained why wheel boy is actively engaged in attempted murder by removing the baby from the safety of the floor for the danger of the platform of death). Hiding the baby in pn 1 is bad juju. Baby-in-peril is the only thing of importance here, SELL baby-in-peril.

    Where is running boy running in from?

    Where's the: crib, bed, diaper bin, baby powder, handy wipes, desk, books, computer, nightstand, bureau, bookshelf, toy chest, aquarium, TV/game station, dog, cat, birdcage, clothes, posters, dart board, model planes ...?

    Watch you ears which should fit between brow and nose. You've lined up the bottoms of ears to the brow, the top of the ears to the nose... eeek

    Perspective starts with two arbitrary decisions. Everything else is carved in stone. I've decided: 1- it's an "average" American tract home; 2- the furniture is store bought (not custom made by, or for, hobbits and giants)

    Blue - Project the top of the window back to the horizon. Where the projection crosses the room's corner vertical is 80" (6'8") off the ground because doors and windows share common header height if not common headers. Split heights in half repeatedly to mark 40"-60"-70" etc. We can now estimate the height of the 8' ceiling and scale the room.

    Red - Drop a vertical for the center line of Mr Red. Project an horizontal from the base of the cabinet. That's the base of Mr Red standing next to the cabinet. Project from the base of Mr Red to anywhere on the horizon. Where the projection hits the floor line, raise a vertical. Using the scale, project a height of 69" (5'9", average American male) along the wall. From Mr Red's VP, project a line through the wall vert at 69" back to Mr Red's center line. We now have the height of Mr Red and can approximate a 48" tall chest. Your cabinet could be an armoire but, it's too tall to be a chest of drawers. There are grownups shorter than 5' and a store bought chest will allow them access to the top drawer.

    Green - Let's say Emerald Boy is 12 years old and, normally, comes up to the chest of Mr Red. Bent over, he'll come to Mr Red's navel. Project from EB's base through the base of Mr Red to the horizon. From there, through Mr Red's navel back to EB. Your EB is the size of a toddler.

    Gold - Let's say EB and Golden Lad are the same height. GL loses 1.5 heads from sitting down. EB loses 1 head from leaning over. Project from EB's base, through GL's base, to the horizon. Project from the horizon back to the mid point of EB's head. GL's head will top out along that 2nd projection. We see that Golden Lad has easy access to the platform of screaming, squishy death.



    Now, you could say I've assigned incorrect heights to all the characters, and you'd be right because they're your characters BUT, the process remains. We KNOW where 80" is, we can scale everything else from that.

    This DOESN'T mean you need graph out every shot in scaled 3 pt perspective. There simply isn't time. But, by using the theory of known heights we can wing things with reasonable accuracy rather quickly. If we look at Pn 1 we can say the top of the bottom drawer is about 12" off the ground. Project that top line back to the horizon and we find that Golden Lad is about 18" tall, EEEK! What does GL have that's about 12" tall? The outside diameter of the rear wheel looks to be about 12". Line up the drawer projection with the top of the wheel rather than GLs armpits. Close enough.

  4. #4

    Post

    Quote Originally Posted by Basilisk View Post
    hey dude! I tried to write this up at like 3 AM last night on mobile, got a few paragraphs into it and then accidnetally backed out and it all got lost xD so imma try again!
    Thank you so much!

    Pn1 im seeing some issues with the right arm and the torso area of the kid running up, specifically where the two meet but that whoel region could use another pass, the Dresser being so solid and neat really draws the eye from the less precise lines of the brothers (?) it doesnt look real, in part because it looks a lil TOO perfect.
    It actually looked way worse. I basically gave up here, having reached a ceiling on my current figure drawing abilities. Always helps to find that ceiling, though.

    I like the angle/view of pn 3.
    Thank you.

    Definately some proportion distortion going on in Pn 4, im no expert but i think it could benefit from moving the vanishing point a lil farther from the panel then it is now and rewording it. The Kneeling Tired kid also seems to be rolling a littlebit to his right in an odd way and im not sure his legs are properly portioned or placed, he looks abit off. (Though i cant do a draw over or anything because i couldnt managed that pose off the top of my head its a pretty tough one!)
    Another one where I reached the limit of my skills.

    Pn 5 there is something super off the the dynamic of this panel, the brother in the wheel chair shouldnt be almost as tall as the dresser, and unless the other kid is still kneeling down shouldn't be as tall as his brother/the other kid.

    But as just a moment before even the kid with the better reach could BARELY reach the top of that dresser.
    Shot is supposed to be a bird's-eye-view. But look! We can't see any of the underside of the baby carrier, the dresser. Oops.

    I think you could benefit from some line weights in this page in general to seperate out details and keep things from being too flat.
    Thank you so much for your reply, it helps IMMENSELY.



    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty View Post
    We'll get to scale in a second. Because story is everything, let's start there (and pretend you've explained why wheel boy is actively engaged in attempted murder by removing the baby from the safety of the floor for the danger of the platform of death). Hiding the baby in pn 1 is bad juju. Baby-in-peril is the only thing of importance here, SELL baby-in-peril.
    Oooh, so that's why that panel is so weak. Talk about an elephant in the room...

    Where is running boy running in from?
    No idea. The guy supplied his original page and asked to see a sample of it redrawn. So, I only have the page, with no letters.

    Where's the: crib, bed, diaper bin, baby powder, handy wipes, desk, books, computer, nightstand, bureau, bookshelf, toy chest, aquarium, TV/game station, dog, cat, birdcage, clothes, posters, dart board, model planes ...?
    Again, these were not in the original page. However, including this stuff probably would have sealed the deal when I submitted the sample.

    Watch you ears which should fit between brow and nose. You've lined up the bottoms of ears to the brow, the top of the ears to the nose... eeek
    That's me trying to draw the head at different angles. When I attempt to do this, they come out looking deformed. I know I need more practice, I feel like I could devote 6 months to drawing heads. Would you mind doing a draw-over of the heads?

    Perspective starts with two arbitrary decisions. Everything else is carved in stone. I've decided: 1- it's an "average" American tract home; 2- the furniture is store bought (not custom made by, or for, hobbits and giants)

    Blue - Project the top of the window back to the horizon. Where the projection crosses the room's corner vertical is 80" (6'8") off the ground because doors and windows share common header height if not common headers. Split heights in half repeatedly to mark 40"-60"-70" etc. We can now estimate the height of the 8' ceiling and scale the room.

    Red - Drop a vertical for the center line of Mr Red. Project an horizontal from the base of the cabinet. That's the base of Mr Red standing next to the cabinet. Project from the base of Mr Red to anywhere on the horizon. Where the projection hits the floor line, raise a vertical. Using the scale, project a height of 69" (5'9", average American male) along the wall. From Mr Red's VP, project a line through the wall vert at 69" back to Mr Red's center line. We now have the height of Mr Red and can approximate a 48" tall chest. Your cabinet could be an armoire but, it's too tall to be a chest of drawers. There are grownups shorter than 5' and a store bought chest will allow them access to the top drawer.

    Green - Let's say Emerald Boy is 12 years old and, normally, comes up to the chest of Mr Red. Bent over, he'll come to Mr Red's navel. Project from EB's base through the base of Mr Red to the horizon. From there, through Mr Red's navel back to EB. Your EB is the size of a toddler.

    Gold - Let's say EB and Golden Lad are the same height. GL loses 1.5 heads from sitting down. EB loses 1 head from leaning over. Project from EB's base, through GL's base, to the horizon. Project from the horizon back to the mid point of EB's head. GL's head will top out along that 2nd projection. We see that Golden Lad has easy access to the platform of screaming, squishy death.

    Thank you for this gold, Smitty.

    Now, you could say I've assigned incorrect heights to all the characters, and you'd be right because they're your characters BUT, the process remains. We KNOW where 80" is, we can scale everything else from that.

    This DOESN'T mean you need graph out every shot in scaled 3 pt perspective. There simply isn't time. But, by using the theory of known heights we can wing things with reasonable accuracy rather quickly. If we look at Pn 1 we can say the top of the bottom drawer is about 12" off the ground. Project that top line back to the horizon and we find that Golden Lad is about 18" tall, EEEK! What does GL have that's about 12" tall? The outside diameter of the rear wheel looks to be about 12". Line up the drawer projection with the top of the wheel rather than GLs armpits. Close enough.
    Awesome, thank you, Smitty. Not sure how soon I'll have another version posted here but I'll update this thread when I get there. Still coloring, ATM, though simply for practice now.

    This page really helped me understand where my ceiling is at currently and what I need to focus on. Gonna continue to play with this page whilst I start a personal project.

    One thing I've decided is to post WAY MORE roughs here on the forum so I can make these corrections before finalising the lineart.

    Thank you guys, you rock. Smitty, you are awesome. Thank you.

    I have always struggled with the frustration of developing these skills to draw three dimensionally. However, things are getting easier and less frustrating. Meditation and self-development is helping with this also but right now, I am still struggling with learning to love the process of growing and developing my skills. I am impatient, I want to be at my goal. The grinding is disheartening and demotivating.

    Any words to help with that problem?

  5. #5
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    Details. Details. Details. Getting the detail is important, long as your deadline is not looming. A publisher more concerned about how well you tell you stories. If you do not have unimportant detail in every panel? Unless it is critical? The Art Director might remove them any way. SAFARI!

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