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Thread: must own comics for comic creators

  1. #31
    Member michaelsammler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pencilero View Post
    Or folks could just read Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud, which they should do anyhow.
    Is Making comics and Understanding comics completly differnt books?
    I have Making comics and refer to it often. Maybe I should pick up Understanding as well?

  2. #32
    I must say I usually pay more attention to the drawings than to the story, with few exceptions (marked with "S"). So my recommendations are supposed to be mainly for artists.

    My favourites list (no particular order):

    Manga:
    - Vagabond by Takehiko Inoue.
    - Death Note by Tsugumi Ohba and Takeshi Obata. (S, my favourite script so far).
    - Blade of the Inmortal by Hiroaki Samura.
    - Rookies by Masanori Morita.
    - Akira by Katsuhiro Otomo.

    European:
    - Asterix by Goscinny & Uderzo.

    American:
    - Shanna the She-Devil by Frank Cho.
    - Anything drawn by García-López, especially Twilight, Batman Confidential: King Tut's tomb and Batman 66 The Lost Episode.
    - Wonder Woman Earth One by Morrison & Paquette.
    - Batman The Killing Joke by Moore, Bolland.
    - Preacher by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon. (S)
    - Watchmen by Moore and Gibbons. (S)

    So my list is mostly focused on art, so I must add that I love and recommend the work of Buscema (mainly on Conan) and Brian Stelfreeze. There are many artists more that I like, but I tried to limit this list to good storytellers (at least in my opinion).

  3. #33
    Member michaelsammler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Almayer View Post
    I must say I usually pay more attention to the drawings than to the story, with few exceptions (marked with "S"). So my recommendations are supposed to be mainly for artists.

    My favourites list (no particular order):

    Manga:
    - Vagabond by Takehiko Inoue.
    - Death Note by Tsugumi Ohba and Takeshi Obata. (S, my favourite script so far).
    - Blade of the Inmortal by Hiroaki Samura.
    - Rookies by Masanori Morita.
    - Akira by Katsuhiro Otomo.

    European:
    - Asterix by Goscinny & Uderzo.

    American:
    - Shanna the She-Devil by Frank Cho.
    - Anything drawn by García-López, especially Twilight, Batman Confidential: King Tut's tomb and Batman 66 The Lost Episode.
    - Wonder Woman Earth One by Morrison & Paquette.
    - Batman The Killing Joke by Moore, Bolland.
    - Preacher by Garth Ennis and Steve Dillon. (S)
    - Watchmen by Moore and Gibbons. (S)

    So my list is mostly focused on art, so I must add that I love and recommend the work of Buscema (mainly on Conan) and Brian Stelfreeze. There are many artists more that I like, but I tried to limit this list to good storytellers (at least in my opinion).
    I am trying to read Vagabond right now. I am about halfway through Vol. 1 and boy is that story slow. Amazing art, but wow that story drags. All his other work does as well though. He had an art show awhile back I went to with giant manga style ink paintings. His work is solid at any size.
    michaelsammler.tumblr.com

  4. #34
    Hi Michael!

    Vagabond is slow, you're right. But I think it is slow first of all because it's manga: manga is normally slower than occidental comic, the narrative ellipsis is shorter in between panels, I think, and that makes it all slower. Maybe due to the fact that usually the writer and the artist is the same guy and when he got a good story (one that sells a lot, like in this case) he tries to profit the most from it by making it longer as possible. Just the way a TV series renew for more seasons when there's not much more to tell. God, Naruto is the best on doing that!

    Then, it is slow because it need to be slow: It's set in an age in which everything happens much more slowly than today. Everyday is the same, there are few distractions, no smartphones, no internet, no movies... for most people only work in the country for the living. So making it slower than usual is a good choice in my opinion. But not just because of that: If everything is slow and only katana challenges are fast scenes, then the blades are even faster. So you give the illusion of Miyamoto being faster and more dangerous!

    Well, in Vagabond everything is slow, even the artist! The project was in standby after he become father of twins, then due to health issues and then after march 2011 Tsunami and what happened in Fukushima. It still is unfinished after 37 volumes and 17 years of production!

    Even so, I strongly recommend its reading!

    And if you haven't seen how he draw I recommend his DVD "Draw!". He has incredible skills! And I must say that I consider him a bad artist in his beginnings (he really mastered drawing by working a lot everyday; you know how hard is manga market and how many pages mangakas have to draw every week (even with assistants it is inhuman!)).

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by turnbolt View Post
    All the Cerebus books... every single damn one... even the ones you almost can't make it through because Dave Sim decided suddenly to become a novelist!

    These books start as little simple parodies of Conan the Barbarian and stretch into a brilliant and intricate web of amazing and deep story with fantastic characters, great humor, big drama and adventure adventure adventure!!!

    Disclaimer: Sometimes adventure has a BROAD definition... Hahahaha!
    Thanks for this, going to add to my Christmas list. Someone else recommended and I forgot. Thanks for jogging the memory.

  6. #36
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    I would have to say if you write you should grab the 2000 AD Script Book.
    I am a huge Garth Ennis fan so his writings on the 2004 Punisher Series are amazing.
    Any genre you enjoy is worth looking into. Walking Dead for non traditional, The Dark Knight or The Killing Joke for long form graphic novel.
    Watchman is a must as is any Stan Lee book you can get ahold of.

  7. #37
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    For layout and composition... any of the last three Brubaker/Phillips books (Fatale, Fade Out, Kill or Be Killed). Phillips style isn't pretty or cute enough for some comic art dinks, but he might be the best compositional storyteller working in comics right now.

    The later work of both Mark Schultz and Hal Foster always blows my mind.
    Even though I'm not a big fan of the story, Charles Burns' Black Hole is stellar artwork.

  8. #38
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    If you're a Stuart Immonen fan I would recommend picking up the underrated Shockrockets. Kurt Busiek wrote a fun story but you can really see this is the point where Immonen's art style shifted towards his Nextwave style which has evolved to where it is today.

    Daredevil: The Man Without Fear is also a great year one story by Frank Miller but this is what solidified my love of John Romita Jr's art.

    I also just recently picked up the first Grimjack omnibus. Timothy Truman's art is amazing and John Ostrander really writes an imaginative location.

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