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Ian Miller
07-14-2003, 10:50 PM
I was wondering today about what types of devices you guys might use for inking.

I originally only used ink pens for inking stories, including buildings, panels, and other things, but then I found that using brushes to fill in large black areas helps a lot, too, which is kinda obvious. I also found that using a regular ballpoint pen on panel borders and buildings and stuff, since they really didn't need any depth or line thickness difference. I also just got some Pigma pens which I use for thin detail lines in sketches and buildings in real comic pages I ink. I also use ballpoint pens for filling in borders of black areas where it's too thin for a brush to fill.

Also, I read something by Gerry Alanguilan about a type of thick tracing paper that some inker uses. You just put it over the pencilled art board, and you can preserve the pencils while having a thick, durable inking surface. What's this stuff called?

Anyway, what do you guys use for inking?

Ragelion
07-14-2003, 11:06 PM
Well, I am not your traditional inker. I know some would say "thats not how you do it", Hey I think I get the jobs done ok.
My hands are WAY too shakey when it comes to a brush or quilled pens, I feel more in control or a REAL pen, but again...that is just me. So here is mainly what I use:
http://www.deviantart.com/deviation/1134010

Ian Miller
07-14-2003, 11:12 PM
A bendable straight edge! Who'd've thought of such a thing existing! where can one be purchased, and how much are they? That may be cool for my inking.

Ragelion
07-14-2003, 11:21 PM
I got that at Office Max, but other office supply stores likes Staples may care it. Any Art store if in your area would have it as well.

Ian Miller
07-14-2003, 11:24 PM
That's really far out. So it's bendy-like, right? does it provide perfect straight edges? It looks kinda mushy from the pic.

Ragelion
07-14-2003, 11:51 PM
It can go straight..but I wouldnt use it as a straight edge like a ruler. It is like soft lead wrapped around soft plastic

Baloodoo Bill
07-15-2003, 03:01 AM
Originally posted by UniverseX259 Also, I read something by Gerry Alanguilan about a type of thick tracing paper that some inker uses. You just put it over the pencilled art board, and you can preserve the pencils while having a thick, durable inking surface. What's this stuff called?


Drafting Film. Takes a little getting used to as it's SUPER SLICK and the surface you ink on is raised from the image but, because it's clear, you don't notice till your brush hits the surface before you're ready. Also, it soaks oils out of your skin so use a sheet of copy paper under your hand or a cel painters glove (a thin cotton glove with all the fingers cut off except the pinky.) The best part is, ink erases easily with a special, yellow, non abrasive eraser. No more whiteout for big booboos.

Ian Miller
07-15-2003, 11:18 AM
So it's called drafting film? Do you know where this stuff can be found?

Jeremy Colwell
07-15-2003, 04:20 PM
Start to finish with Wacom. I used to use brushes, dip pens, Microns, sharp sticks...basically anything that would make the mark I wanted. Now I get all the variety without the mess or potential for injury! :D

Jeremy

Baloodoo Bill
07-15-2003, 06:52 PM
Originally posted by UniverseX259
So it's called drafting film? Do you know where this stuff can be found?

If you can't find it at the Art Store a Drafting Supply Store will do.

Don't confuse it with Drafting VELLUM, which is high quality tracing paper. Vellum buckles heavily under ink, although if you're a "large black areas last" kinda' guy it may be ok. Also, because Vellum is paper, it absorbs ink and can't be erased.

A correction on my earlier post: Film doesn't "absorb" oils from your hand (or ink either, which is why it can be erased), it readily accepts the "transfer" of oils. Wiping it with Rubber Cement Solvent will clean the oil off. The solvent then dissipates in a few seconds.

Inkthinker
07-15-2003, 07:10 PM
I started off using Rapidograph mechanical pens, about 5 years ago. I started off just using different size pens to expiriment with line weights, and then using the pens to simulate brush strokes.

My hands are generally too shaky for a brush, but lately I've been expirimenting with brush-pens, and I used crowquills in high school so sooner or later I'll get around to using them as well. Practice makes perfect.

I use the computer to fill in large areas of black, both to save time and to avoid soaking the page in ink.

Dash Martin
07-15-2003, 10:07 PM
Brush, quill, and techpens...I use em all for different things. I have a mostly finished inking tutorial online that shows how I use each if you want to give it a read through.

Ian Miller
07-15-2003, 10:47 PM
Originally posted by Methane
I have a mostly finished inking tutorial online that shows how I use each if you want to give it a read through.

Sure, I'd love to see it. Can you put up a link to the site?

ecstaticboy
07-15-2003, 10:59 PM
i only use a size1 brush and ink and the ocasional marker for backgrounds. thats all u really need.

Ian Miller
07-16-2003, 10:25 AM
I was actually thinking of using a marker to fill in large black areas recently. What type of marker do you use, Ecstatic? Will any type of marker do?

Dash Martin
07-16-2003, 02:55 PM
Originally posted by UniverseX259
Sure, I'd love to see it. Can you put up a link to the site?

Sure, here it is. Keep in mind this is just the way I do things...but everyone has their own process.
http://mywebpages.comcast.net/dashmartin/tutorial_inking/index.html

Ian Miller
07-17-2003, 08:03 PM
Hey, I also just thought of something. What's the difference between drawing ink and India ink? I've heard that comic inkers use India ink, so that's what I use, but I also have a bunch of drawing ink that's been gathering dust. Will it make a difference if I use drawing ink rather than India ink?

Dash Martin
07-18-2003, 01:13 AM
Doesn't matter if you use India ink or Drawing ink...whichever works best for you and puts down a nice solid black line.

Ian Miller
07-20-2003, 09:40 PM
Geez, I've got even more questions about inking techniques and stuff like that. Here they are:

1) Is it good to dip an ink nib pen in water whenever you run out of ink and before dipping it again like a brush? I had to get rid of tons of nibs because ink would cause the nib to get gunked up and cease to work.

2) What happens if a little bit of water gets put into India ink? I was washing out a bottle of ink when it ran out, and I dried the inside with a paper towel, but I guess it was still kinda wet, cuz when I refilled it, the lines weren't solid enough and came out gray.

Dash Martin
07-21-2003, 01:45 AM
1) I usually just clean the nib in soapy water when it starts to not draw a line. Then shake it dry real good and bend it the other derection on the table while dragging it. I've been using the same two for a few months.

2.) just leave the cap off the ink for a few days. It'll thicken back up.

Ian Miller
07-21-2003, 01:50 AM
Wow, thanks for the tips! By the way, does ink evaporate? Wouldn't leaving the top off cause it to dry up?

Jeremy Colwell
07-21-2003, 02:05 AM
Yes, it will evaporate. Only leave it off until it is the consistency you like. I think you can add distilled water if it gets too thick, but I just used tap because I'm lazy like that. I'd dip right out of the bottle, so all that time it was open, it was drying out.

Jeremy

TomLuth
07-21-2003, 02:16 AM
J. Colwell, there seem to be a number of broken links on your web site. I was interested in looking at your digital inking, but the links do not work.

I recently tried digital inking, with less than satisfactory results. Curious to see how others fare...

Ian Miller
07-21-2003, 02:18 AM
Tom, you've tried digital inking? I've never done it, cuz I'm a purist, I guess, but what do you think of it?

TomLuth
07-21-2003, 02:30 AM
<Tom, you've tried digital inking? I've never done it, cuz I'm a purist, I guess, but what do you think of it?>

While I've inked for over twenty years, this is my first try at digital inking. First several attempts had me drawing minute lines that disapeared or clogged when I printed out proofs. Still a bit funky. I started inking traditionally, but found the Blue Line Pro boards bleed pretty bad with pen, so I decided to scan and ink digitally. I'v eseen the level of work Brian Bolland has been able to do digitally, so I know it CAN be done.

http://www.thomasluth.com/NewFiles/Plague14.html

http://www.thomasluth.com/NewFiles/Plague15.html

http://www.thomasluth.com/NewFiles/Plague26.html

http://www.thomasluth.com/NewFiles/Plague27.html

Ian Miller
07-21-2003, 02:32 AM
Aw, no! The stupid parental controls I've got won't let me access the pages you put up, Tom. Could you perhaps mail me some pics? I'd like to see what you've got there.

Jeremy Colwell
07-21-2003, 11:44 AM
Tom, sorry about that. Most of my site is down since I've had to pull images off to make room for other stuff. Here's an example for you though. It from an upcoming project we (writer and I) will be shopping around soon.
http://home.comcast.net/~ageofthedeities/Issue1/Pg20.jpg

Another one was done for an Invincible draw-off a few weeks back. You can view it here.

http://www.penciljack.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=33208

Jeremy

TomLuth
07-21-2003, 01:31 PM
<Here's an example for you though.>

Okay, I am impressed. Looks compatable with traditional inking. Hard to even tell it is digital. A couple of give-aways on the second piece, but ones that fit in fine.

I am getting a little better (using the largest brush I can still control) but have a ways to go. I work at 600 dpi at print size. I've wondered if I should work at either higher or lower res?

Jeremy Colwell
07-21-2003, 05:01 PM
Thank you. I work 600dpi at print-size, too. It's the best balance of quality versus file size I could get. Plus, if I understand correctly, Marvel (per Epic guidelines) wants all line art at that res and size. My biggest problem is zooming too much and spending a lot of time getting the tiny details right when in print it will only be 1/4 inch tall. Oh well. I tend to keep my line work brushes pretty small and build up lines and then erase to get nice sharp tapers.

Jeremy

Ian Miller
07-21-2003, 08:46 PM
Here's another question. The bottle I put the diluted ink into is the only real good bottle I have for inking. All my other inks come in little bottles with eyedropper tops, and I don't think it's very good to ink out of them. I know they're used to put ink into empty bottles and that's it, but recently I've been putting the ink into a palette thing for concentrated watercolor dyes, but I find that I'm running out of ink fast by doing that.

Does anyone have any suggestions for good types of containers for ink? I'd empty out the existing bottle, but it's filled to the top with unused ink, and I don't wanna waste it.

Dash Martin
07-21-2003, 09:39 PM
I usually squirt some ink in a plastic milk jug cap. It's the perfect size and holdable. A lot easier to gauge how much ink is on the brush or quill, too. If there's ink left over when I'm done, I just put it back in the bottle.

Ian Miller
07-21-2003, 10:27 PM
That's actually a really good idea, Methane. But is it messy trying to get the excess ink back into the bottle once you're finished? I tried pouring the ink back into the bottle, and more ink spilled over the side of the pallete than into the bottle. Maybe I gotta be less of a spaz when I pour it.

Dash Martin
07-21-2003, 10:51 PM
What do you think the eyedropper on the inkbottle is for?

Ian Miller
07-21-2003, 10:56 PM
Well, the eyedropper will squirt stuff out no problem, and it'll pick stuff up, but not in such a shallow area. I have a bottle with a large eyedropper on it, and one with a smaller eyedropper that I haven't used. Would using the smaller eyedropper help to pick up the excess ink better than the larger eyedropper?

Dash Martin
07-21-2003, 11:04 PM
yep.

Ian Miller
07-21-2003, 11:08 PM
Thank you, Methane. You are like a walking encyclopedia, I must say. First you inform me on how to transfer excess ink into its bottle, and now you're helping me fix my scanner. I don't know what i'd do without you! :)

ALLGOLD
07-25-2003, 02:14 PM
If you have trouble with ink clogging up your nib, here's a couple of suggestions. First, I almost always dip the nib in water before and after but not during the inking process. I have a jar of water next to the inkwell, dip it in, flick my wrist down to get rid of the water, dip in ink, ink the art, dip in water, shake out water, repeat. That seems to do the trick. Also, from time to time, I give it a cleaning with some baby wipes. They work good for getting rid of the ink.
I don't know if this has been covered before, but I have found a huge timesaver, the Faber-Castel PITT pens. They have a set of these pens, three different points, and a brush pen. They are completley refillable and cheap! The brush pen works awesome at filling blacks and you use the same ink you would with your brush anyway. My only gripe is the smallest point kinda wears out after a while, but they are so cheap, it really isn't that much of an issue. I highly recommend, try 'em out.

SenorSwanky
07-25-2003, 07:59 PM
For disposable pens/markers, I prefer the Staedtler Pigment Liners. They're Microns but more durable and producing a better quality line.

Dash Martin
07-25-2003, 08:59 PM
Originally posted by SenorSwanky
For disposable pens/markers, I prefer the Staedtler Pigment Liners. They're Microns but more durable and producing a better quality line.

I second that.

Ian Miller
07-25-2003, 10:15 PM
Originally posted by SenorSwanky
For disposable pens/markers, I prefer the Staedtler Pigment Liners. They're Microns but more durable and producing a better quality line.

Yeah, I use Microns. I think they're Pigma brand, but I have a few different sizes, and they're all great for working on buildings or panels or anything else that requires a precision line.

SenorSwanky
07-25-2003, 11:17 PM
Sakura Pigma Microns are the most popular brand (they're what are referred to as "Microns") but of lesser quality than Staedtler. The Faber Castell brush pen is better than the Micron one, but I haven't used the rest of their line.