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southpaw
05-18-2003, 05:13 AM
When a character talks to themselves or the audience?

Has does one present this in a comic book?


IS IT CALLED A SOLIOQUY OR AN ASIDE?

xadrian
05-28-2003, 04:12 PM
An aside is intended directly for the audience. A perfect example is Ferris Bueller's dialogue to the camera.

A soliloquy is more the character expressing internal thoughts to no one in particular, a tool used by Shakespeare at his hight, see Hamlet.

cs3ink
05-28-2003, 04:29 PM
xadrian is right. When a character converses with his/her audience, it is also called "breaking the third wall".

Chip

xadrian
05-28-2003, 10:10 PM
Forth wall. Veteran of many a theater company in my day. But yeah same diff, didn't mean to come of sounding like a jerk.

cs3ink
05-28-2003, 11:25 PM
...didn't mean to come of sounding like a jerk.

You didn't, X. Even as I typed it, I was questioning whether it should be the third or forth wall. I loved theater, but my near manic stage fright ended any aspirations I might have had.

Chip

southpaw
06-02-2003, 07:08 PM
An aside is intended directly for the audience. A perfect example is Ferris Bueller's dialogue to the camera.
A soliloquy is more the character expressing internal thoughts to no one in particular, a tool used by Shakespeare at his hight, see Hamlet

any suggestions in delivering/conveying this idea in a comic.

like an aside would be in square word bubble in the panel. and a soliloquy be outside of the panel...

banshee
06-03-2003, 08:37 AM
I generally use captions. I guess it's the way you present the dialogue.

What y'all think?

B

Mark
06-05-2003, 03:54 AM
If the character is speaking to the reader, you can either have the character looking directly at the reader while speaking, or you can use captions with the monologue within quotation marks. An example is the story "My Stowaway Heart!" from Lovers #23, reprinted online at the following link: http://www.jennymiller.com/romancecomics/l1p21.html

If the character is talking to himself or herself (sometimes called "interior monologue," or "stream-of-consciousness"), you can either use thought balloons, or put the thoughts within quotation marks inside captions. However, if using captions instead of thought balloons to indicate thoughts, I would tend to put in panel descriptions that call for artwork that is clearly illustrating the character's thoughts.

Folgore
06-05-2003, 04:13 AM
I think John Byrne did this a lot in his She-Hulk run - he'd have Shulkie talk to the book's editor (and I believe even the readers) simply by having her face the panel and talk in regular word balloons...just like you would see in Ferris Bueller or Kuffs. Sans the word balloons, natch.

God...why do I remember Kuffs?

xadrian
06-05-2003, 09:32 AM
Originally posted by Folgore


God...why do I remember Kuffs?

Because that movie was AWESOME!!! That's why. For real now.

Seriously, if you planned on using color, the soliloquy could be done with caption squares, the asides could be the character looking at the camera AND they would be the only one in color, the rest would fade to B&W for that panel. Sometimes the readers need help. Just an idea.

Darren Schwindaman
06-11-2003, 03:34 AM
stuff like this is cool, and really expands what comics can do. i recently read understanding comics, and i've also read about grant morrison's animal man. he would address the reader directly, and grant even entered the comic himself and addressed the characters. crazy stuff.
and i've also read about comics that do it documentary-style, where the action will be going on, and then shift to one character sitting in a "confessional booth" or against a black screen just talking as if he's been asked a question.