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MrDowntown
04-21-2003, 02:10 PM
Anyone have any tips for making a comicbook title logo. I figure Illustrator's the way to go but I don't know it too well. Should I draw the words freehand or should I use text and modify it. Anyone done this before?

atom_basher
04-21-2003, 02:13 PM
i like handdrawn logos like



http://www.art-community.com/member/Diablo/Atlas_logo_one_jpg

xadrian
04-21-2003, 02:25 PM
I'd probably end up doing it in a vector program like Flash or Fireworks only because the line manipulation is so much easier than Photoshop. But I don't have Illustrator, it might be the way to go.

Yeah, hand drawn is good too, if you're a draftsman and very precise it can turn out decent.

GIGAFATTYMON
04-21-2003, 03:14 PM
I would say you are better off doing it in Illustrator or Corel Draw. What's more you may even be able to create a font of the characters you make, which you can use for other headings in the book to give it a sense of continuity throughout.

dpedicinijr
04-21-2003, 05:24 PM
Illustrator, use any type then turn it into objects. I have been doing that for 5 years for comics and for logo design for when I worked for one of the largest fireworks importers in the country:Phantom Fireworks. Matter of fact I almost used Illustrator exclusively there.

Spidey
04-21-2003, 06:47 PM
Definitly Illustrator. You can sketch out the layout of the logo then place it in Illustrator and do your vector lines on a different layer. But Illustrator is fo sho one of the cleanest logo producin' programs there is.

Tony Moore
04-22-2003, 02:53 AM
Yeah, what they said.
a vector art program like Illustrator or CorelDraw is the ideal way to go for a sharp, clean logo. And hell, it can even do some nasty crusty ones, too, if you tinker with it a bit.

a pixel-based program like Photoshop is less desireable, because the line and shape manipulation tools aren't nearly as advanced, because that's basically what vector programs were designed for.

a hand-drawn prototype isn't a bad idea, but re-creating it digitally will allow for a more precise model, and vector art is infinitely scaleable, so you can use it on a LOT of stuff.

-T

MrDowntown
04-22-2003, 03:06 AM
thanks for the replies guys

atom_basher, -I'm just gettin an x

xadrian- cool, illustrator seems to be the way to go

GIGAFATTYMON- that'd be sweet but I doubt I'll get that far

dpedicinijr- hey that sounds cool, how do I turn the letters into objects? Sorry I'm pretty low-know-how with Illustrator. Should I type Each letter separately and mold the shape of it?

Spidey- yeah that's a cool idea too, drawing over the pencils, good thinking, thanks

Tony- Alright! I'm down with a little crust, yeah I think I'm gonna go mess with Illustrator some more, thanks

panthroronin
04-22-2003, 10:04 AM
Mr. Downtown, I've found that if you don't have the owners manual to Illustrator , you are just as good to go if you pick up a copy of Classroom In A Book. If you want to get really funky, pick up a copy of Illustrator WOW! also. You can always order the book version you need from any bookstore worth their salt.
I hope this helps.:D

Spidey
04-22-2003, 04:59 PM
As long as you've got the pentool down packed you won't need much else. The pentool is your bread and butter for creatin' logos.
Its a bitch to get used to, but once you get the hang of it you'll luv it.

Tommy
04-26-2003, 07:53 PM
I made my logo using some font I can't remember wich one,
lookie here: http://www.lightbulbcomics.com/cover.html
I made the C and L on paper, then scanned them together. Simple, but it worked.