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atom_basher
04-18-2003, 09:17 AM
a few eeks back i was told an easy way to colored lineart was to preserve the transparencies, but i cannot find the option that says preserve transparency, where is it and how does it look, thnx

Inkthinker
04-18-2003, 12:06 PM
you're looking for a small box to check, it should say something like "Preserve Transparency" or have a little lock symbol next to it (sorry I'm not more accurate, doing this from memory)

Should be at the top of your Layer palette, in Photoshop ver. 5.5 or below.

Not sure where it is in 6 or 7... I'm guessing you should look at the Options bar that runs across the top of the page.

Phil Clark
04-18-2003, 12:29 PM
Actually, this only works if you have your line art in a layer other than the background layer, and if you have selected and deleted all of the white. But I don't see how this helps in coloring.

What I do is I double click the background layer with the lineart (which brings up the layer options dialog) and just click OK. You will notice that the layer name chages from "background" to "Layer 0". Then I set the layer blending option to multiply.

Then I create a new layer underneath this layer and start doing my coloring on that new layer. This way your line art ends up overprinting the underlying color when you flatten the image for either print or web.

Hope this helps.

Robin Riggs
04-18-2003, 08:47 PM
Originally posted by Phil Clark
Actually, this only works if you have your line art in a layer other than the background layer, and if you have selected and deleted all of the white. But I don't see how this helps in coloring.
It means that if you want some of the black lines to appear in colour all you have to do is draw over them loosly with the colour you want. If preserve transparency is checked the colour will only affect the areas that already have colour in them.

Phil Clark
04-18-2003, 09:55 PM
Ahh... Hadn't thought about that. But again, it will only work if you select all the white areas and delete them before locking the transparency of the layer, because white itself isn't transparent. Just locking the transparency will still cause color to be added to areas outside of the linework.

Inkthinker
04-19-2003, 03:13 AM
You don't select the white and delete it, you select the black via Channels and copy it to a new layer, so that you get nothing but black lines premulitplied to nothing.

I show you how to do so right here (http://www.penciljack.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=26956).

Selecting the white and deleting it will still leave pixels that are premultiplied to white, and the result would be a line with a fuzzy grey edge

Robin Riggs
04-19-2003, 12:47 PM
Originally posted by Inkthinker
Selecting the white and deleting it will still leave pixels that are premultiplied to white, and the result would be a line with a fuzzy grey edge
Not if you've already done a threshold adjustment to make all the pixels either black or white which I'd recommend for anyone working with lineart.

What I do is after making my illustaration hard balck and white I select all the black pixels, cut them from the background and paste them into a new layer and select preserve transparency. Saves buggering about with channels and multiplying. You just get your line art on the equivalent of an acetate overlay and a clean white background to paint on all in one step. One of the things I simultaneously love and hate about Photoshop is that there are so many different ways of achieving the same effects. We all have our own preferences and none of them are intrinsically better than others, just different. I think a lot of how we do things depends on which version of Photoshop was our first. A lot of the early users still do a lot with channels because Photoshop didn't have layers and they were working with something like 32mb of ram so they had to really worry about file sizes. Those aren't issues at all these days but some of those techniques persist by being passed on.

Any other ways of doing this? I love hearing other's techniques.

Inkthinker
04-19-2003, 07:29 PM
If it was a non-aliased bitmap, every line would be black or white... but most lines in PS are automatically aliased when the modes are changed in order to soften them. All those aliased edges, when on a flattened Layer, get mulitiplied against the color of the background (usually white). The cool thing about the Channels to Layers trick is that it doesn't premultiply to anything, leaving perfectly aliased lines under which you can lay color.

(I know Robin knows this, that was mostly for the other guys :D)